Friday, April 27

 
 

 
 
 

Rautatientori, 13:52

 
 

A very sunny morning, I thought, as I pulled the curtain at 7:30. I cycled as fast as I could to the metro station in a warm breeze.

I began the morning by watching some videos to try to find some relevant background material for the Interactive storytelling course. I then googled random words and phrases from the videos as a form research by serendipity. I found more useful material than I expected.

I checked my email and then Its Learning and found that most of the students had not obeyed my instructions. I had started receiving random files with mails saying “I wasn’t sure where to send this, so I am mailing it to you. Is that alright?” I answered every one of them explaining that the exercises had to end up in the specially created discussion forums in Its Learning and not in my inbox, so that other students could see and comment on them (the second part of the exercise).

After this I had a long Skype talk with Jutta about Josefin, Markus, Oliver, and their respective theses. We agreed on plans of action and timetables, and other scholarly tools, and then I left for the centre.

I meet an altogether different Oliver at Kiasma to plan the forthcoming Convivial Mechanics activity. We schedule our May event and then start to plan our September mini-festival. Oliver tells about about his time in Cuba and I respond by telling him about my time in Manchester. I explain why I think that Convivial Mechanics and cultural democracy belong together.

On the way back to Arcada I cross the square outside the railway station and see an ice cream van. You do not see these very often in Helsinki, because they have never formed part of any Finnish tradition. I stand and look at it for a few minutes and then continue on my way to the metro.

I will spend the afternoon in a sudden flurry of activity related to my conversation with Oliver. I will ask Sophie Hope if she will consider speaking in Helsinki in September, and ask her for the email address of the man from Red Pepper.

Later I spend two hours reading through the forehandsuppgifter. My mind drifts back to this morning. Most of the applicants did not read the instructions properly and submitted two of the three requested elements. I understand why and, initially, I think that perhaps we did not write the instructions carefully enough. Then, three quarters of the way through the pile, I get a submission with all three elements. Not my fault then; they simply didn’t read the instructions.

Finally I will read Imran’s draft thesis, which proves every bit as good as I expected.

After that I will race home. The extra long weekend starts here.